Kooduthurai – The Confluence of Kaveri, Bhavani and Amudha Rivers

At all times of the year, Kooduthurai is a busy place. People arrive continuously from early morning before dawn till dusk. There is a lot of activity going on all around which you would normally only see at holy places like Varanasi and Rameswaram.

Kooduthurai is the confluence of three rivers at Bhavani near Erode in Tamil Nadu, where the rivers Kaveri and Bhavani unite with the invisible River Amudha.

Kooduthurai (1)Children dive into the river looking for coins that pilgrims throw into the water.

The largest river of Tamilnadu is River Kaveri.

Known to devout Hindus as Daksina Ganga (“Ganges of the South”), the Kaveri River is celebrated for its scenery and sanctity in Tamil literature, and its entire course is considered holy ground.”  -Encyclopaedia Britannica.

River Bhavani is the second largest river in the state. The life giving waters of these two rivers have sustained people who lived along their banks for thousands of years.

In a country where rivers are worshipped, the places where the rivers meet are traditionally believed to be the holiest of places, capable of absolving one of all sins.For this reason, Bhavani Kooduthurai as the confluence is known attracts pilgrims throughout the year. People come here to perform a plethora of ritualistic activities which the scriptures say are best performed on river banks and along seashores and which give the highest benefits when they are done at a confluence of three rivers as seen in Triveni Sangam at Prayag in Allahabad. In the South of India, in Tamilnadu, its equivalent is Bhavani Kooduthurai.

Koodu means to unite in Tamil and Thurai is the padi- thurai, the steps leading down to the river that are called as ghat in North India. Kooduthurai is thus the ghat at the holy confluence.

And what a place it is, spectacular, full of life and utterly magical.

There is a more solemn aspect to this place. Living in Salem ours was a large extended family and whenever there was a death in the family we all went to Bhavani on the day after the cremation to perform the relevant rites and then the ashes known as asthi were immersed in the holy river.

The confluence has always been a place where the soul would find salvation. No wonder the air is charged and tense. Solemn, serious faces are part of the crowds that are always seen here. This place is about the more serious things in life such as death, karma and the inevitability of fate. It is about purifying oneself in the holy waters. Here one is made aware of the thin line that lies between physical death and the transition to another subtle realm. It is both the land of the living and the land of subtle beings. It is the land of gods and the chosen land of rishis, the great teachers and seers. This is not just a meeting place or conflux of rivers; it is also a meeting place of life and the afterlife, a meeting place of sages and devout souls. And always….. the vast waters of the great rivers flow silently on either side – meeting, merging and flowing on, in a continuous  never- ending journey.

The most important of the rituals done here are those done as part of the rites performed when a person dies. They are done by the surviving son, daughter or wife with the help of a purohit/priest who guides them through the vedic rituals.

The second important ritual is one that is performed for departed souls and ancestors on yearly anniversaries called as Thidhi .These rituals are also performed on new moon days (Amavasya) and include prayers for the departed loved ones and purifying baths in the river for the family. Eclipses and new moon days in the Tamil months of Thai and Aadi are considered very auspicious for performing these rites and for this reason, on these days huge crowds throng the Kooduthurai as in other sacred places along the rivers and seas in Tamil nadu.

Thirdly, there are rituals that are part of the pujas done at the time of consecration of temples, and during temple festivals. They are called Theertha vari or Theertha kudam eduthal , and refer to the fetching of the sacred waters in brass pots that are carried ceremoniously to the temple .

Then there are people who come to perform rituals to propitiate the nine planet gods, called Nava grahas, to obtain relief from a variety of doshas or afflictions in the birth chart.

Ritualistic bathing in the sacred waters and fetching pots of water from the river are an intrinsic part of these rites.

And finally there are the pilgrims who have come to take a bath in the purifying waters of the confluence before visiting the ancient Siva temple built at the confluence, the magnificent temple of Lord Sangameswarar.

A first glimpse of the confluence is from the Kaveri Bridge. You can see the Rajagopuram of the Sangameswarar temple, the River Bhavani flowing on one side of the temple complex and the River Kaveri on the other, the Kooduthurai  ghats leading down to the rivers, coracles  near the padi thurai completing  the picture.

Kooduthurai (21)

Kooduthurai and Sangameswarar Temple as seen from the Kaveri bridge. Beyond the temple, a bridge across River Bhavani is seen on the left and another bridge across River Kaveri is seen on the right.

Scenes at Kooduthurai

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Kooduthurai (6)

Kooduthurai (7)

Kooduthurai (8)

Kooduthurai (9)

A coracle ride to the confluence

We took a coracle ride to the Koodal or Sangam. It is a short ride from the ghat and cost Rs.100. The boatman showed us the place where the rivers meet. At the confluence, you can collect the water in cans or bottles to take home with you. The water of River Kaveri is crystal clear and sweet while the water of River Bhavani is comparitively dark and polluted with chemical effulgents from the many dyeing units in this small town. The River Amudha is said to be andhar  vauhini and not visible to the eye. However, local people say that when the water level of the rivers goes down one can see the River Amudha bubbling up like a spring from underneath.

Kooduthurai (22)

Kooduthurai (12)

Kooduthurai (13)

Back at Kooduthurai, there is a large open mandapam where people can perform pujas or other rites. Purohits are appointed by the temple authorities. One can see boards warning people to beware of fake priests. There are also warning signs at specific places along the ghat where the river is deep and dangerous with eddies and whirlpools.

There is a small park where people can have a picnic lunch under the shady trees. As there are only small eateries near the temple, it is a good idea to take food, water and snacks with you.

The place is clean and well maintained. Open bins are kept for the clothes that are discarded after some rituals. Changing rooms are available for those pilgrims who bathe in the river.

Where it is located

Bhavani kooduthurai is located in Bhavani , a town that takes its name from the River Bhavani. It is located 15 kms from Erode and 55 kms from Salem. NH 544H passes through Bhavani.

Pictures from Kooduthurai

These pictures were taken over the past few months. Just like the weather… each visit to the confluence was different and unique. 

Kooduthurai (4)
Sangameswarar temple and Kooduthurai as seen from Komarapalayam on the east bank of River Kaveri

Two of many small shrines near the river.

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Kooduthurai (17)

A rainy day at the confluence and a ceremonial fetching of holy water for a village temple festival

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An old lady on her way home at mid- day after selling the food she has prepared near the ghats.

Kooduthurai (2)

A traditional house is used as a mini mandapam for small events

Kooduthurai (3)

 

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Navarathri – Messages of a Festival

Navrathri Kolu at Sri Ramakrishna Mission Ashrama, Salem

October, 2018

Navarathri means nine nights in Sanskrit, and is the name of the festival dedicated to the worship of goddess Durga Devi. It refers to the nine nights of darkness and of battle against evil and the tenth day of victory and of light.

This year, at the Ramakrishna Mutt temple in Salem, there were five sections in the Navarathri Kolu.

The first section had the most beautiful rangoli of Durga devi, Lakshmi and Saraswati.

During this nine day festival nine different manifestations of the goddess Durga are worshipped. The nine goddesses are Shailaputri, Brahmacharini, Chandraghanta, Kushmanda, Skanda Mata, Katyayani, Kalaratri, Maha Gowri, and Siddhidatri.

The nine devis of Navarathri,the manifestations of devi Durga and the slokas in Tamil for each devi, to be recited during on the nine days of Navarathri

The message of Navarathri is the innate strength of woman. We only need to remind ourselves of this tremendous strength within us. Goddess Durga shows us that we are capable of standing up to evil, to conceit, to atrocity, that we too can stand up and battle the demons in our life. That we can say no firmly to weakness, to fear, to wickedness, to tears, to feeling helpless. Just tell yourself, ‘I am strong’, ‘I can face any hardship that comes my way and triumph’.

The second and fourth sections were the Bommai Kolu – the traditional display of painted clay dolls on specially put up golden steps.

Each step had groups of dolls of different kinds, like,the Chettiar and his wife selling provisions, dolls depicting Dasavatharam, the ten avatars of Lord Vishnu, dolls of Lord Shiva and goddess Parvati and of Ardhaneshwara, Ganesha and Muruga.

Navrathri Kolu (5)

Navrathri Kolu (2)

Navrathri Kolu (1)

The central section had an idol of Goddess Durga as Mahisha Mardhini, the slayer of the buffalo faced demon, Mahishasura. To her right and left are goddesses Lakshmi and Saraswati. Ganesha and Subramanya are seen below on either side of the vanquished demon Mahishasura.

The last section was dedicated to the 125th anniversary of Swami Vivekanadha’s famous Chicago addresses. It showed Sri Ramakrishna Paramahamsa and a miniature of the Art Institute in Chicago,USA, the venue of the World’s Parliament of Religions in 1893.

The Parliament of Religions was held here from September 11 to September 27, 1893.

It was within its halls,that 125 years ago, on September 11th 1893, Swami Vivekananda delivered his famous, trail blazing Chicago address.It was here that his words swayed a gathering of 4000 and went on to sway the heart of a nation, where people had no true idea of India and of the Hindu religion.

He addressed the audience first on September 11. More lectures were to follow in further sessions and he went on to become one of the most popular speakers at the Parliament. His address at the final session was delivered on September 27.  

Parts of his speech and lectures were exhibited at the Kolu, both in Tamil and in English.

The impact of reading his memorable words is as strong today, as it was for those who heard them delivered more than a century ago. For those who were fortunate to hear his words on that day, half way across the globe, the impact was huge and decisive. It permanently changed the way the world looked at India and its understanding of the Hindu religion.

 

Sendhamangalam Someswarar

Sendhamangalam is much like Rasipuram in many ways. It has ancient narrow streets with closely built houses and a scattering of tiny street-end shrines painted brightly with the traditional ochre and white stripes.

Although comparatively quiet today when compared to Rasipuram, it was an important town and administrative headquarters of the kings who ruled over the region even in ancient times.

A brief account of its history from the 13th century A.D. to the 17th century A.D can be found in Wikipedia.

Between CE. 1216 and 1279 CE, Sendamangalam was the capital of the Kadava kings Kopperunchinga I & Kopperunchinga II, who converted it into a military stronghold and fought successfully against Kulothunga Chola III and Rajaraja Chola III, against successive Hoysala kings, and against Jatavarman Sundara Pandyan. The Kadavas remained friendly with the Magadai/Aragalur chief ‘Magadan Rajarajadevan pon parappinan Magadaipprumal’ and the Tirukoilur chief Malayaman. Their kingdom was eradicated by the campaigns of Maaravarman Kulasekara Pandyan I. After the fall of Hoysalas, Vijayanagar EmpireMadurai Nayak ruled this part by Poligar Ramachandra Nayakar.

Temples in Sendhamangalam, Nammakal district

The most famous temple in Sendhamangalam  is the Datthagiri Murugan temple.

The 17th century Lakshmi Narayanan temple is popular among the local people and in the surrounding villages. Built by King Govindappa Nayak and located in the centre of the town, it has a towering Raja Gopuram and is an amazing example of the uniqueness and beauty of  Nayak architecture.

The Someswarar temple is a lesser known Siva temple and the oldest of the three temples in Sendhamangalam.

Legend of Someswarar Temple

Almost as old as the Rasipuram Kailasanathar temple, the sthala purana (literally the history of a sthala or holy place) of the Someswarar  temple says that it was built by Somapuri Raja and that Sendhamangalam was known by different names in different yugas. In the Kritha yugam it was called as Somapuram.  In the Thretha yuga its name was Chandrapattanam.  In the Dwapara yuga it was called Krishnapuram and in the present Kali yuga as Sendhamangalam.

It is believed that Hanuman worshipped the lingam in this temple before going to Lanka.

For this reason, Sri Rama and Sita while returning to Ayodhya after successfully vanquishing Ravana, stopped here to worship lord Someswara with whose blessings Hanuman was successful in his mission to Lanka and which later led to the rescue of Sita.

It is believed that Serndha-mangalam later became Sendhamangalam, The Tamil word Serndha means that which is joined or united and alludes to the story that Rama and Sita came to the temple as a reunited couple.

Although it is not mentioned in the sthala purana, it is a local legend that this was one of the temples which the king of Kolli malai, Valvil Ori regularly visited and that the great king has done thirupani (renovation) in his time (2nd century A.D).

The Temple

The Someswara temple is situated about ½ a km from SH 95 which is also the main road in this small town. With no signboards showing the way to the temple, it is the local people who guide you to the ‘Sivan Kovil’. There are houses and farmlands all around.  From the outside it looks like any other village temple, but after many temple visits I have learnt that there are unique features and surprises in every temple. So it was in this unassuming village temple which had beautiful architecture and the shrines though small were exceptional.

The temple faces east and all the shrines face due east barring a few like the Dakshinamurthy and Kaala Bhairavar  shrines which always are south facing ones.

Past the Kodimaram and the Nandi mandapam, the Someswarar shrine has a pillared mahamandapam, an arthamandapam and garba griham.

Someswarar Nkl (23)

After praying before Lord Someswarar, to the left of the garbagriham, in the artha mandapam, we see the idols of Lord Chandra, and Lord Surya with Lord Sani seated between them. They are beautiful deities depicted as being seated together on a raised peedam. The idol of Sani is small in size when compared to that of Chandra and Surya deva, almost like a small boy sitting between the two devas. As in Thirunallaru, a temple famous for the worship of Lord Sani, the Sani Bagawan here faces east. Since Saneeswara is seen with Chandra and Surya it is believed that those who suffer from planetary afflictions will find relief if they worship here.

Opposite these deities is the navagraha peedam with the nine planet gods. Lord Saneeswara deities in both the navagraha peedam and in the raised peedam with Chandra and Surya, are facing each other, an arrangement of deities seen only in this temple. Therefore it is believed that worshipping here gives relief from the adverse effects of Sani dosha and Navagraha dosha.

In the pradakshina path, the Dakshinamurthy shrine is large and has its own open pillared mandapam, very much like the one in Rasipuram Kailasanathar temple. He is depicted as Yoga Dakshinamurthi.

Someswarar Nkl (11)

Kanni moola Mahaganapathi is the sthala Vinayakar, The Subramanya shrine is more elaborate with a pillared outer mandapam. Here, within the same shrine are two beautiful depictions of Lord Murugan – one as Sri Bala Dhandayudhapaani and the other as Sri Subramanya with Valli and Devyani.

Someswarar Nkl (9)

The name of Ambal is Soundharavalli ambal. The separate temple of the goddess is next to the shrine of Lord Someswarar.

Someswarar Nkl (13)

Another unique feature of the temple is the Arubathu moovar sannidhi. It is in very few temples that we can see the 63 nayanmar saints of South Indian Shaivism together with the 9 Thogai adiyaargal who are also revered in southern Shaiva siddhantha.Someswarar Nkl (32)

This temple is a must visit temple when you are in Namakkal as Sendhamangalam  is barely 11 kms from Namakkal. It is a very popular venue for weddings for the people living in Sendhamangalam and also in nearby villages. There is a modern marriage hall adjoining the temple.

Highlights

A temple where Lord Rama worshipped Lord Siva

A temple where Hanuman performed puja to the lingam

Goddess Soundharavalli bestows people with all prosperity.

Goddess Swarna Durgai removes obstacles and gives victory. People pray to her for success in studies, in business, for marriages for the unmarried, and for the boon of children for the childless.

Lord Murugan blesses devotees as Sri Bala Dhandayadhapani and also as Sri Subhramanya with Valli and Devyani, in the same shrine.

As in Thirunallaru, in this temple Sani Bhagawan faces east. Another Sani Bhagawan is seen facing the first idol. Besides, Sani takes his place with Surya and Chandra to remove Sani dosha and Nava graha dosha .

In this temple, the Nayanmars are 72 in number. This includes the 63 nayanmars and the 9 Thogai Adiyaargal.

Someswarar Nkl (20)

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The Theppakulam which is in a very dilapidated condition is located a short distance from the temple. You can just make out the padi thurai – the steps built at a strategic place on the outer perimeter of the tank and the fallen remnants of the Neerazhi mandapam in the middle of the now barren holy tank. The tank was built with a view of the Kolli hills in the background and one can’t help thinking what a lovely sight it would be if the tank was restored and filled with water!

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The fallen remnants of the mandapam in the middle of the tank

How to reach Sendhamangalam

Sendhamangalam is 11 km from Namakkal, the district headquarters.  It can be reached by taking SH 95 which is the Mohanur- Namakkal- Sendhamangalam- Rasipuram highway. It is on the way to Kalappanaickenpatti, where you take the road leading to the Kolli Hills.

From Rasipuram it is at a distance of 26km on SH 95.

Both Namakkal and Rasipuram have good hotels where you can stay and visit nearby temples.

Timings

9.30 a.m to 12.30p.m

Timings are extended on special days and festivals.

Someswarar Nkl (37)

Contact Details

Gurukkal T.M. Rajkumar

Mobile no:  94423  09413

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KalKurichi Karpooranatheswara

Close to the village of Belukurichi, famous for its ancient temple and weekly market is Kalkurichi, a picturesque village near the Kolli hills.

The Karpoora natheswarar temple is the small ancient Siva temple located in this peaceful village. There are neat farmlands all around. The village road passes by the temple and it faces the beautiful Kolli Malai hills.

Karpura natheswarar koil (10)

Karpura natheswarar koil (7)The importance of the temple lies mainly in the fact that this was one of the temples patronized by legendary King Valvil Ori of the Kolli hills, who ruled from Kolli malai around the 2nd century A.D. The temple we see today was built much later.

Related post: The Kingdom of Ori

The history of the temple is based on oral tradition. In the absence of Sthala purana or other historical records, oral tradition and local beliefs are valuable and reliable sources of information because they have been handed down from generation to generation in the families which have always lived there.

Karpura natheswarar koil (13)The Temple

A small temple with one pradakshina path enclosed by an outer wall, there is nothing pretentious about it.The open mandapa in front is a concrete structure and has a Nandi facing the sanctum and goddesses Lakshmi and Saraswathi on either side of the entrance where normally Dwarabalakas are seen. This placement of the goddesses is rather unique to this temple.The archagar Sendhilkumar remembers that many years ago,the temple used to have a Nandi mandapa and a mandapa over the idols of goddesses Lakshmi and Saraswati. These were so dilapidated that the pillared structures were replaced with a large concrete roof. He had come from Koovaimali Palaniappar temple to open the temple for us.

Karpura natheswarar koil (6)

Karpura natheswarar koil (3) 300

Inside the sanctum sanctorum in the light of the oil lamp Lord Karpooranatheswara has a powerful presence that can be felt when one stands before the Sivalingam. The shrine of goddess Karunai Kadaatchi is a small shrine to the right of the Karpooranatheswarar shrine. The entrance to this shrine is through the enclosed mahamandapam which is common to both shrines. When Deeparadhanai is performed, in the light of the ghee lamp, one can see the beautiful eyes of the goddess, eyes that are filled with compassion, true to her name. The word karunai means compassion and Karunai Kadatchi means one whose glance is full of compassion.

The pradhakshina paadhai or circumambulatory path has smaller shrines that are typical of a Siva temple.

The vimana or roofs of these shrines have beautiful architecture. The Ganapathi shrine has its own small open mandapam.

Karpura natheswarar koil (2)Behind the Ganapathi shrine is a small shrine for Mahavishnu. Almost an alcove in the corner on the far left, it has idols of Vishnu holding a conch and chakra and Sridevi and Bhudevi on either side. There is even a tiny Garudalwar inside. The villagers have installed a Hanuman idol facing the alcove and like to worship the deity as Ramachandra murthy, a name for Lord Rama!

Karpura natheswarar koil (8)The goshtam are shrines in alcoves in the outer wall of the main shrine and have some unusual deities. There is Narthana Ganapathy (a form of Ganesha in dancing posture), Lingothbavar ,Dakshinamurthi and goddess Durga and a small shrine for Chandikeswarar. There is a separate shrine for lord Sani near the Kala bhairavar shrine.

Karpura natheswarar koil (17) 300

Karpura natheswarar koil (19)

Karpuranathaewara

The Murugan shrine is more elaborate with a bigger open pillared mandapa and a peacock idol, the peacock being the vahana of Karthikeya.Karpura natheswarar koil (21)

The Navagraha shrine is an ancient one while the Arubathumoovar  shrine is new.

Karpura natheswarar koil (5)There is a Kal Vettu in the temple. It is a vertical granite slab 3 ft high with inscriptions in Grantha script, according to the archagar. Epigraphists have visited the temple but could not decipher the writing mostly because it is covered in lime and mortar. This is one for the experts. When the lime has been removed what interesting information is recorded remains to be seen.

Karpura natheswarar koil (12)The temple has been renovated by the local villagers and is well maintained. Pradosham and Ashtami pujas are held regularly.

The archagar Sendhil Kumar in charge of this temple is also in charge of the famous Koovaimalai Palaniappar temple near BeluKurichi a few kilometres from here. He opens the KalKurichi temple once every day for puja.

Both the temples can be visited together and the archagar is happy to open the Kalkurichi temple for visitors if they desire to see it. Besides, the archagar’s house is on Koovaimalai and you can call on him and ask him to take you to Kalkurichi temple which is what we did.

Contact details:

Archagar Sri Sendhilkumar

Mobile no. 95244 49931

Belukurichi Palaniappar Temple under Renovation

June 2018

The historic Palaniappar temple in Koovaimalai near Belukurichi is currently closed for renovation. The renovation work has been undertaken by the Arulmighu Palaniappar Kolli Hills Charitable Trust. The trust has come out with an invitation to all to take part in the renovation.

While the temple is closed to visitors, all the deities are kept in Paalaalayam in a temporary shelter opposite the temple. Visitors can worship here and the archagar lives nearby and can be called on for puja. The midnight pournami (full moon night) puja which has been a unique puja at this temple continues to be done with the utsava moorthi and still attracts big crowds. The same holds true for sashti and krithigai day pujas which are special rituals for lord Murugan.

Although visitors will miss going around this charming hill temple, they can still visit the hill to see the work being done, to enjoy the panoramic views of the Kolli Hills and surrounding places. Most importantly they can enjoy the quiet peacefulness and refreshing breeze that blows down from the mountains full of the fragrance and goodness of the mountain herbs. The drive to koovaimalai is a beautiful drive along excellent roads with all the charm of the countryside underlying these lush mountains.

Contact numbers of the Charitable Trust:

95666 56956, 98427 34187

Pictures from Koovaimalai:

Palananiappar temple

Belukurichi Palaniappar temple 2018 (7) edited
Office building

Belukurichi Palaniappar temple 2018 (2)

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Belukurichi Palaniappar temple 2018 (9) editBelukurichi Palaniappar temple 2018 (8) edit

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Belukurichi (2)

PS: Make sure you have snacks, fruit and/or food in hand when you visit because this is an isolated place. There are no hotels in Belukurichi, but you can take packed meals from Rasipuram which has good hotels.

 

 

 

THE TEMPLES OF SINGALANDHAPURAM

Close to Rasipuram in Namakkal district of Tamil Nadu is the village of Singalandhapuram, one of many beautiful villages beneath the Kolli hills. The people here are mostly engaged in weaving and farming.

The village is believed to be named after Chola Emperor Rajaraja who ruled between 985 and 1015 C.E. Singalandhagan was a honorific title given to Rajaraja after his subjugation of the northern part of Sri Lanka.

Thiruveswarar Temple – A temple in the land of Valvil Ori

The Thiruveswarar temple is the Siva temple in this village. It is easy to locate as the Rasipuram – Sendhamangalam- Namakkal road passes beside the temple.

Thiruveswarar koil Singalandhapuram (6)

The temple is ancient and is believed to have existed during the Sangam Age 2000 years ago. It is one of the six temples in the region where legendary King Valvil Ori worshipped Lord Siva. A granite statue of the king is seen in front of the mandapam of Nandi emperumaan (Nandi).There is another stone plaque next to it that depicts King Ori and his queen. A similar plaque is seen in the Palaniappar temple in Belukkurichi, a few kilometres from here.

The Temple

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The temple has a high madhil or outer wall and there is no entrance gopuram tower. The entrance is a simple building with a tiled roof and a thinnai much like the entrance to traditional village homes seen in Tamilnadu.

Thiruveswarar koil Singalandhapuram (3)
A thinnai is an important part of the architecture of Tamilnadu houses and is an open raised verandah with pillars on either side of the entrance. It reflects the slow pace of life in the villages and has multiple uses. Among others it is a place for a meeting, a place to rest for the weary traveller, a place where you could just sit and watch the world go by.

Inside the temple there is a vast spacious open courtyard with the main shrine in the centre and smaller shrines built around the courtyard. Surya and Chandra are seen on either side inside the entrance. The Surya idol is ancient.

Thiruveswarar koil Singalandhapuram (12)

Past the Deepasthamban and Balipeetam is the small, charming Nandi Mandapam with a beautiful nandi. Across the courtyard is the temple of Thiruveswarar. The name of the lord Siva is Veerataanam Udaya Naayanaar which is the name inscribed in the kal vettu – stone inscription on the outer prakaram of the Sivan sannidhi. The present name of Thiruveswarar is probably derived from it.

Thiruveswarar koil Singalandhapuram (13)

Thiruveswarar koil Singalandhapuram (11)

Thiruveswarar koil Singalandhapuram TN

Thiruveswarar koil Singalandhapuram (8)

The shrine of goddess Pankajavalli Thaayar is a separate temple next to the shrine of Thiruveswarar. A small nandi is seen in front of the goddess.

Thiruveswarar koil Singalandhapuram (9)1

Tiruveswarar koil

Adjacent to the shrine of Pankajavalli Thaayar is the shrine of lord Murugan as Subramanyaswami. He is depicted seated on a peacock with Valli and Deivanai standing on either side. Both the Pankajavalli Thaayar shrine and the Murugan shrine share a common mandapam. The construction of this mandapam is recorded in the epigraphic details of the inscription seen on the outer wall of Thiruveswarar shrine.

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The temple of Bhadrakali

To the left of the Nandi mandapam, in the temple courtyard cum circumambulatory path, the first shrine is a separate temple of goddess Bhadrakali. A temple for Bhadrakali within a Siva temple is very unusual and therefore unique. It has an exceptionally beautiful idol of goddess Bhadrakali. The goddess faces due north and is believed to be extremely powerful.

Thiruveswarar koil Singalandhapuram (7)

The people of Naadar community in the village have a separate temple for Bhadrakali amman a short distance from the Thiruveswarar temple. The rituals for Bhadrakali worship include Kundam and thee midhi rituals as well as sacrificial rites. These rituals are unique to Bhadrakali and Mariamman temples and differ from the rituals followed in Siva temples. Therefore, during festivals the people of the village come to the Tiruveswarar temple, offer prayers at the Bhadrakali shrine and having obtained the blessings of the goddess, observe the rituals in the other temple.

Other Shrines

Thiruveswarar koil Singalandhapuram (5)

The other shrines are ones that are usually seen in Siva temples.

The Ayyappan shrine is a relatively new addition along with the Arubathu moovar sannidhi. The shrine of Veerabadrar, is again an ancient structure and has a beautifully carved idol of the deity.There is a Vinayaka shrine which is a raised open mandapam. Dakshinamurthy, Lingothbavar and Durgai are seen in alcoves in the goshtam- outer wall of Thiruveswarar shrine. There is a small shrine for Chandikeswarar, and individual shrines for Jyeshta devi and Kalabairavar.

Rare Features of the temple

  • The Murugan shrine faces due south which is very rarely seen in temples. Villagers say that this is a powerful deity. It is a popular venue for marriages in the village. Most importantly villagers vouch for the fact that weddings conducted before this Murugan never end in divorce. There may be minor differences of opinion between married couples but these are always resolved. Most families here prefer to have marriage ceremonies solemnized in the Thiruveswarar temple and book a mandapam (wedding hall) for the marriage reception afterwards.
  • The north facing Bhadrakali shrine is also something that is rarely seen in Siva temples.

Inscription

There is one stone inscription in the prakaram, on the outer wall of Thiruveswarar sannidhi.

Thiruveswarar koil Singalandhapuram (4)

Visit to the temple

Our visit to the temple was on a Friday evening in May. It was raining intermittently with the onset of an early south-west monsoon. An unexpected abhishekam for goddess Pankajavalli was under way. A middle aged woman and her son had asked for the abhishekam as a vaendudhal (request to the goddess) for divine grace to secure a good job for the son. The evening abhishekam happened because the archagar had been engaged for other ceremonies in the village that morning, it being a shuba muhurtham day (auspicious day), which turned out to our advantage. After the abhishekam and puja we had darshan in the Thiruveswarar shrine.

The temple has the ambience and beauty of very old places of worship and the people of the village have taken pride in maintaining its antiquity. It is a very popular temple for marriages.The pradosha puja in this temple is attended by a large number of people from nearby villages. At this time food is prepared for hundreds pf people and  served on plantain leaves. 

Timings

The temple is open from 5.30 to 7.30 a.m. in the morning and from 5 to 7.30 or 8 p.m. in the evening. The archagar’s house is next to the temple and outstation visitors may contact him over phone.

Contact details:

Archagar Singalandhapuram Maadhu

Mobile no: 94883 20080

KarpooraNarayana Perumal kovil Singalandhapuram

Sri Karpoora Narayana Perumal Temple, Singalandhapuram

At the Thiruveswarar temple we learnt from the archagar that there was a Perumal (Vishnu) temple close to the Siva temple and that both temples were constructed in the same time period.

We visited the temple on a Saturday as the aged Bhattar kept the temple open only on Saturdays and on Tiruvonam days when the village folk would be sure to visit. It was an arrangement that was convenient for both considering the fact that the Bhattar lived a good 5 kms away.

The temple is close to the Thiruveswarar temple further up the highway. But houses obscure the view from the road and it’s easy to miss the small lane that leads to the temple.

KarpooraNarayana Perumal kovil Singalandhapuram (4)

The temple looks impressive from the outside with a big ground in front with a massive peepal tree and a neem tree and beneath them the ubiquitous Arasamarathu Pillayar, as old as the temple itself. If these holy vrikshas could speak, the tales of a thousand of years would be told, as they stand silent witnesses to happenings over eons.

KarpooraNarayana Perumal kovil Singalandhapuram

This is the temple of Sridevi Bhudevi samedha Karpoora Narayana Perumal. Like the Tiruveswarar temple it is an ancient temple believed to be 2000 yrs old. There is a garuda sthambam with a small mandapam before the temple gopuram (gateway tower).A madhil encloses the temple on all sides. On entering we find that a large part of the temple is modern construction taken up with the blessings of His Holiness, Srirangam Jeer Swamigal. The deities  in the garbagriha, Sridevi,Bhudevi and Karpoora Narayana Perumal are very beautiful. There are inscriptions in Tamil-Brahmi on the base of the outer walls of the Garbagriham. The Bhattar says that it refers to a Chola king with the title of Thirubhuvana Chakravarthi. Perumal faces south which is something that is rare in Vishnu temples. The power of Karpoora Narayanan is tremendous and all prayers are answered. 

A modern concrete hall has taken the place of the mahamandapa. The dwara-palakas and idols of Anjaneya and Vishvaksena are kept here.

Karpura Narayana Perumal Singalandhapuram nkl

KarpooraNarayana Perumal kovil Singalandhapuram (1)

KarpooraNarayana Perumal kovil Singalandhapuram (6)

KarpooraNarayana Perumal kovil Singalandhapuram (2)Inscriptions

KarpooraNarayana Perumal kovil Singalandhapuram (7)

The Saturaday puja in this small village temple was something to remember. There was a small gathering of people from the village who waited while the Bhattar made preparations for the neivedyam and pooja. There was a recital of Divya Prabhandam and Thirupaavai by two young women and a priest. The girls strung together strings of jasmine and thulasi after the recital. The heartfelt puja was very nice. The Bhattar stood in front of the garba griha and handed out the prasadam of sarkarai pongal as the gathering formed a line and received the prasad from him in small paper cups. The piping hot sweet pongal was the tastiest prasad I have ever had.

The temple is open on Saturdays from 7 am until noon.

Contact details

Archagar Gunaseela Iyengar

Mobile no: 94429 66983

Singalandhapuram is a large village in Rasipuram taluk of Namakkal district It is 8.5 kms from  Rasipuram on SH 95 (Rasipuram- Sendhamangalam- Namakkal – Mohanur road)  and 5 kms from Belukkurichi.

Note: Singalandhapuram is also the name of another village in Thuraiyur near Tiruchi and this village too is believed to be named after Rajaraja Chola.

 

Walk To A View Point- Karadiyur Viewpoint Yercaud

14th May, 2018

This summer, after a spell of scorching heat and dry weather we had our first summer rains in mid- April. A few more showers later, we even had a hailstorm; now with intermittent rains the days are actually cloudy and pleasant with cool nights!

I love the rains that come in summer for two reasons –

  • Summer rains are mostly late afternoon rains.
  • They are very dramatic (read loud and noisy!) with lots of lightning and loud claps of thunder overhead.

I love listening to the combined sounds of pouring rain and thunder and to feel the hot air change slowly to cool.

And in Salem, in summer when it rains, we know that it has rained in the hills as well.

Karadiyur View Point -Yercaud

Yercaud has many view-points and views are spectacular at all times of the year. Some of them like Lady’s Seat, Pagoda Point and the view-point near Servarayan temple are very popular with tourists. There are view-points that are not so well-known but located in beautiful locations in the hills.

Karadiyur viewpoint (10)

Karadiyur view point is one such vantage point located off Nagalur road at a distance of roughly 8 kms from Yercaud Lake. There is enough signage along the way to guide you. It is a vertical cliff overlooking a valley and it is promoted as part of eco-tourism in the hills by the Forest department which has erected a watch tower. This is also where the trekking route from Karadiyur view-point to Ull-gombai begins. The trekking route is a distance of 4.8 km.

Karadiyur, incidentally takes its name from karadi or bear as bears were once plentiful in the region.

Walk to the watch tower

To reach the watch tower you have to walk for a kilometer from the main road through the village and the forest. It is an easy walk and well worth the effort. The path is a delight as it passes through beautiful forest. I met very few people along the way.

Vehicles with good ground clearance can ply part of the way on the mud road, but the last 5oo metres have to be covered on foot. You can park your vehicle as we did near the sign on the main road which says, ‘Eco Tourism – way to Karadiyur View Point’.

Karadiyur viewpointKaradiyur viewpoint (6)

The path looked like this.

Karadiyur viewpoint (5)

Karadiyur viewpoint (4)

Slushy from the rains

slushy

Karadiyur viewpoint (3)

 

Karadiyur viewpoint (8)

From the watch tower the ground seems to literally fall away beneath your feet as a thickly forested valley and hills is spread out below and around you. It is a remarkable experience. Beyond the valley we could see lakes glistening in the distance.

karadiyur watch tower
The watch tower

Karadiyur viewpoint (7)

 

 

Karadiyur viewpoint (11)

yercaud views

Karadiyur viewpoint (9)

The view-point is desolate and not frequented by tourists mainly because there are no roads leading right up to the view-point like the other view-points here. What is appealing about this place is that it is isolated and litter free.

Be sure to carry water and if accompanied by children, taking snacks with you is a good idea as there are no shops in the area. Also make sure that you are wearing suitable footwear.

This is the best place to visit for everyone who likes to enjoy quiet moments with nature.

Read more posts on Yercaud:

A Peek Into The Past

Gently Down The Lake In Yercaud

Favorite Place – Yercaud