A life size stone image of King Valvil Ori in the Kailasanathar temple in Rasipuram, TN

RASIPURAM KAILASANATHAR TEMPLE

Rajagopuram of Kailasanathar temple,Rasipuram

RASIPURAM

Rasipuram is a small ancient town with narrow streets and many small but very old temples. Its historical name was Rajapuram.

It is famous for the ghee that is made here called Rasipuram Nei. It has a rich and wholesome flavor.

The silk sarees that are woven here are beautiful. They are known as Rasipuram Pattu and the silk weaving tradition of this small town goes back many hundreds of years when the silk cloth made here was sent to neighboring countries.

Today in addition to the above, it is well known for the many educational institutions around it.

 Its proximity to the Kolli hills makes it an important stop enroute to the hills.

And it was part of the Kingdom of Valvil Ori.

The featured image is the stone sculpture of King Valvil Ori in the temple.

LEGEND

According to legend the existence of the temple spans four yugas. A granite slab within the temple gives us details of the legend of the temple and of Rasipuram town.

In the Krudha Yugam the town was called Indrapuram. The name of Lord Siva was Neelakandamoorthy worshipped by Indra, king of the gods.

In the Tretha Yugam, the town was called Devapuram. Siva was called Chandrasekarar and he was worshipped by the nine planet gods.

In the Dwapara Yugam, the town was called Vichitrapuram. The lord took the name of Sitteswarar and he was worshipped by siddas and rishis.

In the Kali Yugam, the town was called SriRajapuram and Lord Siva’s name was Kailasanathar worshipped by a hunter and people of the Aadhi Saivar community.

Legend of the Rasipram Kailasanathar Temple
Legend of the Rasipram Kailasanathar Temple

HISTORY

Like many old towns its history dating back to the 1st or 2nd century CE starts with the temple of Lord Kailasanathar.

King Valvil Ori ruled from Kolli malai. He was a kind and generous king loved by his people. A great warrior, he excelled in archery and the story of his killing an elephant, a tiger, a deer, a wild boar and a monitor lizard with a single arrow was told and retold in lands far and wide. His kingdom included the areas of Rasipuram and Sendhamangalam.

Valvil Ori was a great devotee of Lord Siva.

One day, while hunting he was on the trail of a Venn Panri or white pig which led him a long way deep within the forests near Rasipuram. He saw it enter a clump of bushes and shot his arrow into the bushes. Parting the bushes to claim his prize, Ori was startled to see a large Sivalingam hidden in the vegetation. Worse, he saw blood trickling down from the lingam where his arrow had hit it. He realized that it was Lord Siva who had appeared as the Venn Panri. Falling to the ground he prayed to Lord Siva to forgive him. Lord Siva appeared before the king and said that he should build a temple where he found the Lingam. King Ori built a temple for Siva. The sanctum sanctorum or Karuvarai which we see today is believed to be built by Valvil Ori. Later other kings added to and extended the temple.

Click here for an earlier post on King Valvil Ori

THE TEMPLE

 

kailasanathat-templerasipuram

mahanandi

A narrow street leads to the Iswaran koil as all Siva temples are called by the local people.

Entrance to the temple is through the Rajagopuram which faces west. The beautiful Nandi Mandam with exquisite carvings has a large Nandi. Another mandapam which covers the inner prakaram leads to the artha mandapam and sanctum. The name of Lord Siva is Kailasanathar. The Sivalingam faces west which is special and only found rarely. The Swayambhu lingam is fairly large and bears the mark of a scar where it was hit by King Ori’s arrow. This scar can be seen when abhishegam is performed. The sanctum believed to be built by Valvil Ori is very old. The artha mandapam in front of the sanctum is full of the most beautiful stone carvings.

kailasanathar-photo-courtesy-dinamalar-com
Kailasanathar  Photo couresy – Dinamalar.com

An ancient doorway to the right leads to an inner prakara and another door ahead opens on the outer prakara. In this inner prakara on both sides of the door from the arthamandapam are two unique shrines. One has a rare embossed sculpture of Vikata chakra Vinayagar carved from a single stone and who has a rudraksha mala in one hand. The shrine to the right of the doorway has the idol of Lord Veerabadra with a Nandi in front.

Vinayakar,Kailasanathar Kovil, Rasipuram
Vinayakar,Kailasanathar Kovil, Rasipuram
Veerabadrar, Kailasanathar Koil, Rasipuram
Veerabadrar, Kailasanathar Koil, Rasipuram

The name of the Mother goddess is Aram Valartha Nayagi. She faces East and is very beautiful. There is a Mahameru before her. My visit to the temple was on the day after Adi Pooram which is sacred to Parvati, and so was blessed with a darshan of Ambal dressed in all her finery…truly a sight to behold. I was able to take a picture of Ambigai in this alangaram. You can see Ambal wearing two garlands made entirely of glass bangles of all colors. Beautiful,isn’t it ?!

Aram Valartha Nayagi, Rasipuram
Aram Valartha Nayagi, Rasipuram

There are two shrines for Lord Murugan. He stands alone as Dhandayudhapani in the first shrine. In the second shrine we see him as Karthigeya seated on a peacock with Valli and Deivanai standing on either side. Saint Arunagirinathar has sung a Tirupugazh hymn on the Murugan of this temple.

The first shrine on the pradakshina path in the outer prakaram starts with the shrine of Lord Kasi Viswanathar with Visalakshi and ends with the shrine of lord Ramanathaswamy with Parvatha vardhini. It reminds us of the beautiful Kasi-Rameshwaram tradition. The pradakshinam itself is truly beautiful with many old and lovely shrines. The sthala vriksham are Nelli and Vilvam trees. There are separate shrines for Sani bhagavan, Kala Bairavar, Pancha lingams, Gajalakshmi, Saraswati, Aiyappan, 63 Nayanmars and four Santhanacharyas.

Chariot shaped alcove on a temple wall, Kailasanathar koil,Rasipuram
Chariot shaped alcove on a temple wall, Kailasanathar koil,Rasipuram
Lord Krishna playing the flute, embossed image on temple wall Kailasanathar temple, Rasipuram
Lord Krishna playing the flute, embossed image on temple wall Kailasanathar temple, Rasipuram
Nayanmars, Rasipuram temple
Nayanmars, Rasipuram temple
Santhanacharyas Kailasanathar temple, Rasipuram
Santhanacharyas Kailasanathar temple, Rasipuram

The Dakshinamurthi shrine is different, almost a small temple by itself. The temple has a utsavar or procession deity of Lord Dakshinamurthy with his four rishi disciples. On the first Thursday of each month, He comes to the shrine of the main Dakshinamurthy. Yellow threads placed in puja are offered as prasad to devotees.dakshinamurthy-shrine

There is a shrine for Naagar, the serpent deity.

Naagar, Kailasanathar koil,Rasipuram
Naagar, Kailasanathar koil,Rasipuram

VALVIL ORI

A rare and unique feature of this temple is the life size stone sculpture of King Valvil Ori under a Vanni tree, in the outer prakara near the Rajagopuram.

It is the Featured image of this post. It depicts King Ori, tall and majestic with a sword at his hip. Hands folded he is shown deep in prayer to his beloved Siva.

Aadi Perukku is an important festival in the Kolli hills and on this day special abhishekam is performed for this king with puja.

In many old temples, we find granite sculptures of the kings, queens or holy men who built the temple or were associated with it, which is how we come to know about them besides the temple inscriptions in Vattezhuthu, which is the ancient written form of the Tamil language.

Another myth of this temple is that there is a secret underground passage from the Kailasanathar temple that leads to the Arapaleeswarar temple in Kolli Malai.

Do visit this lovely temple!

TIMINGS

The temple is open from 6 am to 12 noon and from 4.30 pm to 8.30 pm.

LOCATION

Rasipuram is 33 kms from Salem in Tamil Nadu, and 27 kms from Namakkal.

 

 

 

 

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “RASIPURAM KAILASANATHAR TEMPLE”

  1. Wealth of information, as usual. I recall the two val vil stories you’ve mentioned from my school days. These fit in nicely with the two posts you’ve written so far. Thank you again for this noble and very useful service you’ve undertaken.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s