Kaala Bhairavar Temple – Adiyamaan Kottai

The village called Adiyamaan Kottai (அதியமான் கோட்டை) is located eight kms from Dharmapuri in Dharmapuri district of Tamil Nadu. It was once the historic fortress of the Adiyamaan kings – a line of Tamil Velir(வேளிர்) kings who ruled over Dharmapuri, Salem and surrounding regions.

Some ancient temples are located within this area. One of them is the temple of Lord Kaala Bhairavar, the God of Time. It is a small and beautiful temple with only one shrine –the shrine of Kaala Bhairavar. There are no shrines for other deities not even for Lord Vinayaga. It is thought to be as important as the Kaala Bhairav temple in Varanasi, one of the holiest cities in India.

Kaala Bhairava swamy temple, Dharmapuri, TN

History

Originally believed to have been built in the Sangam era(4th century BC to 2nd century CE) by Adhiyaman Neduman Anji,( அதியமான் நெடுமான் அஞ்சி) the most famous king of the Adhiyaman dynasty, this famous king was also one of the seven great donor kings of ancient tamilagam –the kadai ezhu vallalgal(கடையேழு வள்ளல்கள்).

It is said that holy men and sages were sent to Kasi/Varanasi by King Adiyamaan to bring the idol of Kaala Bhairavar which was duly consecrated in a temple in his fort. The reign of King Adiyaman Neduman Anji  spans a turbulent period in the history of Tamilagam which was rife with wars between the kings known as kuru nila mannargal(குருநில மன்னர்கள்). The temple was built by Adiyaman Anji to ensure victory in the many battles he fought.

It is believed that when King Adiyamaan was killed in battle by his foe – the Chera king Peruncheral Irumporai, the royal ladies and children used a secret underground path from this temple to escape from the enemy.

These stories belong to a genre known as karna- parambarai (கர்ண பரம்பரை) which means they have come down to us by word of mouth. Often happenings that span a couple of thousand years are told as stories from generation to generation. These stories are a unique way of remembering history and are as good as the written word.

The present temple was constructed in the 9th century CE.

Importance of Kaala Bhairavar

Kaala Bhairavar is a form of Lord Siva.

Worship of Lord Bhairavar is common to Hinduism, Buddhism and Jainism.

The Sanskrit word kaala denotes time.There are good times and bad, moments, hours, the daytime and night-time, sunrise, sunset, years, lifetimes, yugas and so on, all of which are a part of the great circle of time, the Kaala chakra. A Sanskrit verse from the epic Mahabharata quotes Vidura as saying,

kālaḥ pachati bhūtāni, kālaḥ saṃharate prajāḥ |
kālaḥ supteṣhu jāgarti, kālo hi duratikramaḥ ||

Time devours all things, Time kills all that are born.
Time is awake while all else sleeps, Time is insurmountable.

– Vidura in Mahabharata

It is this unseen reality of the universe -Time, that Siva as Lord Kaala Bhairav rules.

Kshetra paalaka

Lord Bhairava is also known as kshetra paalaka and is worshipped as a protective guardian deity. Shrines for Kaala Bhairav can be seen in all Siva temples. It is a temple ritual to submit the temple keys at closing time  to KaalaBhairav who guards the temple at night.

He is the custodian and protector of the 52 shakti peetas all of which have a shrine for Bhairava.

He is also the protector of pilgrims and travellers.

It is believed that he liberates us from the influences of the navagrahas, cures chronic diseases and fulfills wishes in no time.

The Temple

Kaala bhairava temple,Dharmapuri
Temple entrance,Kaala Bhairavar swamy temple,Adiyaman kottai

This temple has a pillared maha mandapa, an artha mandapa and the Garba griha.

Mahamandapam

The Mahamandapam of this temple is unique. The ceiling is divided into nine sections – each is designed as a diamond shaped recess called a chakra. Thus each is a chakra for each of the nine planets. The chakras representing the planets are designed around the central Surya chakram. Devotees are asked to walk under the chakras and then offer prayers to Kaala bhairavar.

The idol of Kaala Bhairava is seen with his vahana, the dog, on a Padma peedam, the lotus pedestal. It is about three feet tall and faces south. Although the deity holds a trisul, a kabalam and has a halo of flames around its head, it is a very peaceful, benevolent form.

An ancient idol of Nandi is seen facing Kaala Bhairavar in the maha mandapam .Behind the image of Nandi is a stone pedestal that is used for lighting a lamp. There is a carving of Vinayaga at the base of the pedestal and one of Nandi at the top. The images are typical of a Siva temple, though this is not one in the traditional sense. They are probably there because kaala bhairav is worshipped as an avatar of lord Siva.

There are running reliefs of sculptures that go all around the outer walls of the temple. Take time to look at these sculptures that depict war scenes, gods, and armed soldiers and so on.

Kaala bhairava temple, Dharmapuri

Kaala bhairava temple, Dharmapuri (5)

Kaala bhairava temple, Dharmapuri (6)

 

Kaala bhairavar temple Adiyamaan kottai
Weathered engravings of lord Muruga seated on a peacock and of lord Vinayaka

Kaala bhairava temple, Dharmapuri (3)

Kaala bhairava temple, Dharmapuri (4)
This panel shows warriors on elephants and horses.

In the outer courtyard there is a statue of Parshvanatha Tirthankara on a raised pedestal. Called as Mahavirar by the local people, not much is known about it though it is generally thought that the saint supported the king when the temple was built. In any case it is a classic example of religious harmony of the age.

ParashwanathThirthangara
Idol of Parashwanath Thirthangara seen outside the Kaala Bhairavar temple in Adiyaman kottai

In fact the temple itself was lost to time until over a decade ago when a swami from Karnataka visited the temple and explained its importance. The area around the temple was covered in vegetation so much so that it was almost impossible to go near the premises. On the sanyasin’s advice,it was cleared, a kumbabishekam was done and worship was resumed. Devotees from the state of Karnataka were the first to visit, followed by people from Tamil Nadu. 

The temple did not have a gopuram until the present gopuram and other mandaps were added around three years ago. Although the extensions are necessary considering the enormous crowds that this temple attracts, it is a fact that they detract a little from the beauty of the temple and its location in an idyllic rural setting.

Unusual Customs

Some customs are unique to this temple and perhaps to the worship of lord Kaala bhairava.

Palm leaf plates with unusual diyas made out of white pumpkin halves, coconut diyas, and diyas made of lemon halves are sold for Rs.50 a plate. Lighting these deepams/diyas is said to ward of the evil- eye, bring success in business and relief from all kinds of problems in life.

Lamps of a different kind
Cast away the evil eye- Villaku- diyas fashioned out of coconut halves,white pumpkin halves and inverted lemon halves. Ghee, neem oil and sesame oil are used separately to burn these unusual deepams.

Another unusual custom is to circle the temple 18 times on ashtami – the eighth day of the lunar fortnight and on Sundays. Given the big crowds that come to the temple on ashtami days every month, it is an unusual  sight to see so many people circling the temple at the same time.

Why this temple is unique

Temples dedicated solely to lord Kaala Bhairavar are rare and this temple is one of them.

It is a 1200 years old temple and the deity belongs to a much earlier period in time – the Sangam Age of 2000 years ago.

It is one of the temples situated within the historic area known as Adhiyamaan kottai, which is the Tamil word for fortress of Adhiyamaan.

Note:Adiyamaan was the name of the one of the dynasties that ruled ancient Tamilagam which was as powerful  as the better known Chera, Chola and Pandya dynasties of the time.

Best time to visit

Although it is considered auspicious to visit the temple on Thei-pirai ashtami days, Sundays and new moon days if you hope for a peaceful visit sans crowds avoid visiting at these times. Weekdays are usually quiet. The temple is a great favorite with astrologers.Special homam and poojas are conducted on certain days. Priests urge you to take part in these, temple shop-keepers urge you to buy the deepams unique to this temple… but even without all this it is a fact that this is a temple where prayers are answered.

Location

The temple is located just off the Salem-Dharmapuri road, 6 kms from Dharmapuri in Tamil nadu.

Temple timings

7 a.m to 12 noon

4 p.m to 8 p.m.

Address

Sri Kaala Bhairavar Swamy temple

Adiyamaan Kottai,

Dharmapuri district

Tamil Nadu – 636 807

External links:

http://www.thehindu.com/features/magazine/tamil-jain/article5504164.ece

http://www.jainsamaj.org/rpg_site/literature2.php?id=850&cat=42

 

 

 

 

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17 thoughts on “Kaala Bhairavar Temple – Adiyamaan Kottai”

  1. Dear Dream Temples,
    I already decided to go to this temple [alone] on upcoming Ashtami – 12/10/2017; but I am looking for the good posts and experience by the people who had already visited this unique temple.
    Your blog, sharing, explanation and photos are very useful for me and thanking you so much for such a wonderful blog with clear explanation.
    After reading your blog I have changed my mind not to go on Ashtami because of the large crowd and decided to go before that on any week days with my wife.
    Many wishes for your great service.
    Best Regards,
    Sasikumar Devabalan
    Chennai

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you for your valuable feedback. Knowing that the information I write is useful for devotees like you, makes the writing of this blog worthwhile.
      If time permits please visit the mallikarjuna swami samedha Kalyana Kamakshi temple in Dharmapuri, also called kottai kovil or kottai kamakshi kovil locally.It is a one of a kind temple in tamilnadu, very old and the only place that has a shrine for soolini durgai. The Chenraya perumal temple near Kaalabairavar temple is an ASI protected monument which has a mandapam full of natural-dye paintings of the Vijayanagara period,
      Best Wishes for a great trip.

      Like

  2. Loved this post and the pictures. So much treasure we have. Strifes in the name of religion, that have been present through history, not withstanding, the Tamil literature contributions by Jains are outstanding, are they not? The Sangam literature to this day form the bedrock of our culture and thinking. Was it not a Jain who wrote, “Naaraayana ennaa naavenna naave ” pointing out the experience of unity among religions? Thank you so much for this lovely and informative post.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Visiting such temples and finding such unexpected treasures makes me realise just how the ancient Tamil society lived in religious harmony with the patronage of the ruling monarchs at the very beginning of the CE.The religious strifes came a little later I think .
      Thank you so much sir for sharing your views.

      Like

        1. Caves and dwellings of Jain ascetics are found in many places in TN but its the first time I have seen an idol in a Hindu temple.Tamil literature of the Sangam age and religious hymns – Thevaram – of the 7th to 9th century speak of constant debates and power struggles and conspiracies between the Jain monks and Saivaites.

          Liked by 1 person

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