Sevvantheeswarar Temple-Seerapalli

A Temple under Renovation

At 8.30 a.m. on this December morning mist covers the countryside as we drive through NH 44. We are travelling to Seerapalli ,a village near Rasipuram in Namakkal district, where there is an ancient  Siva temple that is believed to be more than a 1000 years old. The route as always beautiful, takes us through the ancient town of Rasipuram and on to SH 79 which is the Rasipuram – Attur –Erode road.

Ten kilometers  from Rasipuram and we have arrived. There are no name-boards and I ask for directions to the Sevvantheeswarar temple. It turns out that that the temple is quite close to the main road, down a small village street, and it is open!

A typical village temple built in a large open area. The village almost ends near the temple and beyond it vast green fields stretch into the distance. It looks lovely.

Sri Sevvantheeswarar koil, Seeraapalli (14)

Until recently there used to be an ancient mud and stone outer wall which was almost crumbling down. It has been taken down and work has been started on a new outer wall. With no outer entrance we walk past the Suryan and Chandran shrines on either side , past a small bali peedam, and a tall weathered wood post which was the kodi maram (flagstaff) in more prosperous times. There is a small nandi mandapam. Beyond this five steps lead up to the main temple which consists of a spacious pillared mahamandapam, artha mandapam and garbagraham of Sevvantheeswarar. A little shrine of goddess Sugandha Kundalambigai leads off the mahamandapam.The vimanam of both shrines are very old.

Sri Sevvantheeswarar Seerapalli,Nkl dt.

Sugandha kundalambigai Seeraapalli

An aged priest does deeparadhana and gives vibhuti and kumkum as prasad. Then he says quietly, “Valvil Ori vazhi patta koil”.Translating from tamil it means that Valvil Ori worshipped lord Siva in this temple.

Time and again I am filled with wonder when people unexpectedly speak of this great king. The region of the Kolli hills, its foothills, Rasipuram and its surrounding regions were once part of the kingdom of king Valvil Ori who ruled from Kollihills around the 2nd century AD.in the Sangam era. That people speak the name of this king with love and quiet pride now, almost 2000 years later is amazing and touching at the same time!

Click here to read about King Valvil Ori

The temple is believed to be built by kuru nila mannargal, the kings who ruled over small regions in Tamilnadu.

Legend

In a distant past the place where the temple now exists used to be a forest of thorny sangu-mul plants. People rarely came here except for cow-herds who brought their cows to graze. One day a cow-herd noticed a cow shed all its milk in a particular spot. This happened every day and the cow-herd told the villagers about the cow’s strange behavior. The villagers set forth to clear the area of thorny bushes as they searched for the reason behind the cow’s unusual behavior. Someone’s axe or sickle hit something hard and blood spurted all over the place. The frightened people discovered a suyambu lingam in the undergrowth, named it as Sevvantheeswarar because it was red with blood and started worshipping it.

Another story goes that once a man was travelling with his pregnant wife in the region when his wife went into labour. The couple cried out for help. Lord Siva appeared as a woman and helped to deliver the child and from then Sevvantheeswarar was also called as Mathru Bhoodheshwarar.

Similarities with Thayumanavar  temple, Trichirapalli

Mathrubhoodeshwarar is also the name of Lord Siva in the famous Thayumanavar temple in rock-fort(malai-kottai), Trichy.

Incidentally, Thayumanavar was also called as Sevvanthinathar because  sage Saaramamunivar worshipped Him with Sevvanthi flowers.

In both temples, ambal has the name of Sughandha Kundhalambigai in Sanskrit and Matuvar kuzhal ammai in Tamil.

Even the name Seerappalli is reminiscent of Sirapalli, the ancient name of Tiruchirapalli.

Arubathu moovar

The temple has ancient stone sculptures of Arubathu-moovar, the sixty three saints of the Saivite tradition and also of Naalvar,the holy four of Thevaram hymns – Appar, Sambandhar, Sundaramurthy Nayanar and Manickavasagar.They can be seen in a long mandapam with a thatched roof to the left of the main shrine.Further along the circumambulatory path are the shrines of Niruthi Vinayakar and separate shrines for Panchalingam representing the five elements.

Sri Sevantheeswarar koil, Seeraapalli 1
Naalvar
Sri Sevantheeswarar koil, Seeraapalli (2)
Arubathumoovar sannidhi
Sri Sevantheeswarar koil, Seerapalli (4)
Niruthi Ganapathy
Sri Sevantheeswarar koil, Seerapalli (5)
Panchalingam sannidhis

The shrine of Kalyana Subramanyar is old with its own vimanam, outer mandapam and a tiny mandapam for the peacock.Kalyana Subramanyar is seated as Aarumugam on a peacock  with Valli and Devasena on either side.In the small inner mandapam of this shrine there is another idol. This is an idol of Palaniappar , holding a spear in one hand and wearing his hair in a kondai(knot) on his head.This idol looks very similar to the image of Palaniappar in Belukurichi temple in Pallipatti in the Kolli foothills which is about 12 kms from Seerappalli.The idol of Palaniappar was the one which was originally in the sanctum, but was later replaced with the idol of Kalyana Subramanyar.

Click here to read about Palaniappar temple in Belukurichi

Sri Aarumuga peruman Seerapalli
Kalyana Subramanya swamy,Seerapalli

Palaniappar Sevantheeswarar koil , Seerapalli

There is a shrine for Sri Durgai in the outer wall of the main sanctum and separate shrines for Chandikeswarar, Kaalabhairavar  Suryan, Chandran and for Sani bhagavan.

Sri Durgai, Seerapalli Sevantheeswarar koil
Sri Durgai,Seerapalli

More pics from the temple

Vinayagar,Seerapalli
This charming Ganapati is seen just outside the Sevvantheeswarar temple

Sevantheeswarar koil,Seeraapalli (12)

fish symbol on temple wall Seerapalli
Fish symbol is seen in many places in the temple
fish symbol sevantheeswarar koil Seerapalli
Fishes in many sizes adorn the ceiling of the Sevvantheeswarar temple mahamandapam
different views of Subramanya shrine in Seerapalli
Different views of Subramanya shrine Restoration is much needed.
Sri Sevantheeswarar koil, Seeraapalli (13)
Carving on the base of the vilakku sthambam
Sri Sevantheeswarar koil, Seeraapalli (10)
Rustic charm – Mandapam of Arubathu moovar sannidhi

Temple lands

The temple has vast agricultural lands belonging to it which indicates that it received the patronage of kings who donated lands for the upkeep of the temple. The temple is traditionally managed by the people of gounder community who also till the temple lands.It is also under the care of the Aranilaya thurai of the Tamilnadu government.

A story is told about how the Sevvantheeswarar temple and the vast lands belonging to it came to be administered by the gounder community.In any village the agraharam was and still is the area where the brahmins  lived. Once, when caste discrimination was being rigidly followed, a cow unfortunately died in the agraharam and the austere brahmins had to seek the help of the gounders who were a farming community, to remove the carcass. The gounders agreed to help on the condition that the Sevvantheeswarar  temple be handed over to them.The agraharam residents agreed as they had no choice and relinquished their rights over the temple. Having lost their right over the temple they then handed over the temple lands also. With the passage of time they left the village. The present gurukkal comes from a family that has cared for the temple for the past ninety years and says that only one family from the agraharam families who left the village long ago visit the temple occasionally.

Renovation

Renovation work has been started in the temple. Besides a new outer wall, the old well has been dug and made bigger. Many parts of the temple are to be rebuilt. All who would like to take part in this momentous work in any manner are welcome to do so.

Address and contact number of gurukkal of Sevvantheeswarar temple:

K.S. Sivaraja Gurukkal

Seerapalli P.O,Rasipuram Tk.

Namakkal district.TN

Phone no: 89732 75242

A subject for discussion

Although there is no conclusive proof there is a possibility that this temple might be a thevara vaippu sthalam that is mentioned in the Kshetra Kovai hymn of Thirugnana sambandhar. The related stanza of thevaram is given below.

திருஞானசம்பந்த சுவாமிகள் அருளிச்செய்த
பொது தேவாரத் திருப்பதிகம்
(இரண்டாம் திருமுறை 39வது திருப்பதிகம்)

(இரண்டாம் திருமுறை 39வது திருப்பதிகம்)
2.039 பொது – திருக்ஷேத்திரக்கோவை
அறப்பள்ளி அகத்தியான் பள்ளி வெள்ளைப்
பொடிபூசி யாறணி வானமர் காட்டுப்பள்ளி
சிறப்பள்ளி சிராப்பள்ளி செம்பொன்பள்ளி
திருநனி பள்ளிசீர் மகேந் திரத்துப்
பிறப்பில் லவன்பள்ளி வெள்ளச் சடையான்
விரும்பும் மிடைப்பள்ளி வண்சக்கரம்மால்
உறைப்பாலடி போற்றக் கொடுத்த பள்ளி
உணராய்மடநெஞ்ச மேயுன்னி நின்றே. 2.39.4

Arapalli agathiyan palli vellai

Podipoosi yaarani vaanamar kaatupalli

Sirappalli siraapalli semponpalli

Thirunani palliseer magendirathu

Pirappil lavanpalli vella sadaiyan

Virumbum midaipalli vannchakkaram mal

Uraippaladi potra kodutha palli

Unnaraai madanenjame unni ninrae.

If you know more about this please share your views here.

 

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Lakshmi Narayanan Temple, Sendhamangalam

sendhamangalam 1Sometime during the 16th century CE Salem and its surrounding areas which include Namakkal, Dharmapuri, and Attur, came under the rule of Madurai Nayakar kings. The kingdom of the Madurai Nayakar kings consisted of 72 smaller administrative regions called palayams headed by local chieftains who were called Palayakarars. Salem under the Madurai Nayakars rule came under the Palayakarars known as Gatti Mudali and Nayaks. Besides collecting taxes, they ably administered the regions they ruled, maintained armies, built forts and built or extended temples. The temples they built and those that were extended by them are architectural gems, showcasing their keen interest in art and architecture.

NAYAK TEMPLE ARCHITECTURE

sendhamangalamtemple carving
A beautiful damsel and her parrot.Beautiful sculpture in a temple doorway

Nayak temple architecture had a distinct style. It was characterized by enormous multi-storied gateway towers called gopuram, richly decorated with brightly painted stucco figures of gods, goddesses demons and animals both real and mythical, and pillared mandapas. The large courtyards surrounding the central shrine of these temples were designed to accommodate the crowds who would gather to view temple rituals and processions of gods. The temple grounds were enclosed by high fort like outer walls called madhil – always useful in case of invasion from rival chiefs and invaders.

sendhamangalam lakshmi narayanan temple

Lakshmi Narayanan temple in Sendhamangalam, 11kms from Namakkal in Tamil Nadu, is one such impressive structure. Sendhamangalam today is a sleepy village taluk in the Nainamalai foothills. It is also very near the Kolli hills in Namakkal district. But centuries ago it was an important admintrative centre of the Nayakar kings.

ANTIQUITY

The temple of Lakshmi Narayana Perumal is extremely old. According to the local people no one really knows how old it is, but it has been there since paattan,mupaattan kaalam.This colloquial Tamil phrase is used often in rural Tamilnadu and is a charming way to state that something has been there or was done since time immemorial. Pattan is tamil for grandfather and mupaatan denotes their fathers – three generations removed before them.

The antiquity of the temple is supported by another important fact. Two kilometres from Sendhamangalam is the famous Nainamalai hill with the temple of Varadharaja Perumal at the very top. The hill itself is 2600 feet high with ancient stone steps going all the way to the top. There are more than 3000 steps and climbing them is no mean feat. Believed to have existed since four yugas – which time period spans millions of years, the temple was built during the Pallava period. To this day, it is an important pilgrimage destination and kula deivam (family deity) temple and thousands make the difficult ascent to the top every year, particularly in the sacred Tamil month of Purataasi.

The two temples are intrinsically connected. In the ancient mandapam leading to the sanctum sanctorum of Lakshmi Narayana Perumal are kept the idols of Nainamalai Varadharaja Perumal,Sridevi and Bhudevi. All those who are not able to visit the hill temple and the old and infirm can worship here. There is also a sealed and locked doorway which is believed to be the entrance to a secret passage way that goes all the way up to the Nainamalai temple. Mysterious and intriguing, isn’t it? The passage way was probably used as an escape route by local kings in times of war. Similar secret pathways are also believed to have existed in the Rasipuram Kailasanathar temple and the Kaala Bhairavar temple in Dharmapuri.

LAKSHMI NARAYANAN TEMPLE

sendhamangalam (3)
Rajagopuram, Sendhamangalam Lakshmi Narayanan temple

In a tranquil rural setting, the towering multi-storeyed Rajagopuram and high surrounding walls of Lakshmi Narayanan temple are so unexpected that they take one by surprise. This could easily have been a temple in Kumbakonam where such huge gopurams are the norm. On entering, the massive doorway opens on a spacious open courtyard. The large pillared mandapam has ornately carved pillars showing mounted warriors in combat and mythical incidents.

King Govindappa Nayakar
King Govindappa Nayakar

Here we find a larger than life statue of King Govindappa Naicker on a stone pedestal. The statue depicts an authoritative king. The upward slant of the face, the hair knotted on top in a style known as a kondai that was typical of the age, an outstretched hand with a forefinger pointing in a commanding manner, the folds of the clothes and impressive jewelry all combine to create a regal and slightly fearsome personality.

This outer mandapam also has idols of other gods and a shrine for navagrahas.

Venugopala swamy, Sendhamangalam
Venugopala swamy, Sendhamangalam
Dwarapalakas
Dwarapalakas

A narrow passage leads to the sanctum through an inner mandapam.

Lakshmi Narayana permal
Lakshmi Narayana Perumal
Nainamalai Varadaraja perumal in sendhamangalm temple
Nainamalai Varadaraja Perumal in Sendhamangalm temple

In the sanctum the 6 feet high idol of a seated Lakshmi Narayanan with Thayaar on his lap is exquisitely beautiful. It is in the inner mandapam that the idols of Nainamalai Varadaraja Perumal with Sridevi and Bhudevi are kept. So we get to worship the deities of both temples here.

THAAYAR SANNIDHI

The Thaayar sannidhi is a small separate temple next to the main temple. Perundevi thaayar is as beautiful as her name suggests and a picture of compassion and grace.

Thaayar, Sendhamangalam
Perundevi Thaayar,Sendhamangalam

A WALK AROUND THE TEMPLE

sendhamangalam 3

sendhamangalam 2

Ganapathy near the main doorway
Ganapathy near the main doorway
Intricate Patterns on a temple doorway
Intricate Patterns on the temple doorway
gomukam
Gomukam

lakshminarayanan temple 2

Lakshmi Narayanan temple

It is a temple to be seen and admired at a leisurely pace because it is full of surprises. My visit was a hurried one and I hope I can visit again to admire and be awed all over again.

LOCATION

The temple is near the Sendhamangalam bus station.

Distance from Namakkal – 11 kms.

Distance from Rasipuram – 26 kms

Distance from Salem  – 53 kms

A Visit to Ooty Government Botanical Garden

Entrance of ooty botanical garden

ooty gardens

There was a light drizzle when we visited the Ooty Government  Botanical Garden on a Sunday morning in August. The weather forecast was for rain with a chance of thunder-showers. The light rain did not deter visitors to this most popular garden; most of them carried umbrellas or wore hooded jerkins and rain coats.

Ooty Botanical garden is one of the most beautiful places in the hill-station. It belongs to the colonial era, an expression of the traditional love of gardens of the British. The initial layout of the Ooty Botanical gardens was prepared by the Marquis of Tweedale in the late 1940s with the prime purpose of growing vegetables and supplying them to European residents at an affordable rate. In 1847 funds were raised to transform the venue into a horticultural society and public garden. The garden was designed by William Graham McIvor, a professional gardener from the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew, England. McIvor arrived in Ooty in 1848 and it took ten years for the garden to be completed.

The gardens are laid out on the slopes of Doddabetta and the entrance is at the bottom of the hill, so you have to climb your way up to tour the ascending gardens. It is landscape gardening at its most alluring, the layered beauty of the bright green lawns, the flower beds, and shrubbery in a series of terraces against a backdrop of thick woods and some of the tallest trees making it a magical place.

Spread over 22 hectares it has several sections.There is a Lower garden, a New garden, the Italian garden, a conservatory built in 1912 and many nurseries.

 

Beautiful lawns -Ooty botanical gardens
Beautiful lawns -Ooty botanical gardens

India map Ooty bot.garden

The map of India is a carpet-bed design made with bedding plants of different colors. It shows all the states clearly and is a major landmark in the garden. Opposite the India Map is another main attraction of the garden, a fossil tree trunk from the National fossil Park at Tiruvakkarai in Villupuram district of Tamil Nadu which is more than 20 million years old. It is a great favorite with tourists.

Fossilized tree trunk- link to the past
Fossilized tree trunk- link to the past
bot. garden ooty 1
A private residence inside the botanical garden, Ooty

garden design ooty (2)

Ooty botanical garden
Ooty botanical garden
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Layered terraces and lawns in the Botanical garden, Ooty
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An archway in the Botanical garden of Raj Bhavan, Ooty
Carpet-bed garden design,Ooty
Carpet-bed garden design,Ooty

ooty gardens

Paved pathways lead up to the many levels of the garden. I had fond memories of the Toda mund at the very top of the garden from an earlier visit many years ago. And so we climbed higher and higher enjoying the breathtaking views of the gardens, stopping to rest and to take pictures, inhaling the eucalyptus scented air. At one place the air was heavily scented from the magnolia blossoms on a row of magnolia trees. It was a very pleasant walk.

ooty bot. garden

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Massive! A giant tree in the Botanical garden,Ooty

Toda Mund

At the very top of the hill slopes the paved pathways and landscaped gardens end and we followed a mud path that went up through the woods of towering pine and eucalyptus trees. This path takes you to the Toda mund which is a settlement of the Todas, the indigenous tribe of the Nilgiris. On reaching the grassy meadow of Toda mund, I was heartened to see that nothing had changed. At the far end of the beautiful meadow is the Toda temple which you can see from outside. It is built in a circular pit, a curved structure made of grass, bamboo and cane and stone,and has a tiny entrance. The front wall is decorated with symbols – of the sun, moon and the sacred buffalo.

There was a herd of sacred buffaloes under the shady trees at the top of the meadow. One or two stood up on our arrival, to inspect intruders like ourselves, and then went back to chewing cud. It is beautiful up at the Toda Mund. Traditional Toda dwellings are gone and the Todas live in modern houses. But the temple remains symbolic of a people who zealously follow their unique culture. Behind the temple the hills rise up, terraced farms forming layers of green on the hill-sides.

Toda Mund,Ooty
Toda Mund,Ooty
Toda temple ooty
Toda temple Ooty
Toda temple ooty 1
Toda temple,Ooty

On the walk back to the Botanic gardens we took a different path, as the mud path was wet and slippery, stopping to chat and ask directions from the garden workers.

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Beauty of fallen tree trunks on sloping lawns- Ooty
Canons and viewing places
Canons and viewing places

 

ooty bot gardens

It was noon when we left the gardens. There is a Tibetan market just opposite the main entrance that sold knitwear. Here we were directed to a Momo restaurant further down the road where they serve Tibetan cuisine. Piping hot bowls of veg.Thukpa and hot momos were just right for a rainy day!

Other posts on Ooty:

OOTY – A Weekend in August

Stone House Museum – Ooty

Rose Garden Ooty-For All Lovers of Roses

 

 

 

Rose Garden Ooty-For All Lovers of Roses

hillside landscaping

Situated on the slopes of Elk Hill, Rose Garden, Ooty is one of the largest rose gardens in India and its collection of roses among the largest in the world. April – May is the best time to visit the gardens for spectacular displays of roses.

According to the Tamil Nadu Horticultural department, “Centenary Rose Park, Udhagamandalam owes its genesis to the Centenary Flower Festival. It covers an area of 4.00 Ha comprising of five terraces. The Rose Garden is situated in the lower slopes of the Elk Hill in Vijayanagaram Farm on the North Western side facing the Udhagamandalam Town. 

The Rose varieties planted in this Garden were assembled from different sources i.e., Bangalore, Chandigarh, Kodaikanal, Yercaud besides Nilgiris and more than 25,000 Rose plants of 3800 varieties have been planted. The collection includes Floribundas, Polyanthes, Miniatures, Hybrid Teas and Creepers. Gradually, it is proposed to increase the number of varieties to 50000 by introducing new varieties from different Centers in India and abroad. The Garden includes major attractions such as Arches, Bowers, Tunnels, Umbrellas, Green Houses, and Fountains and ‘Nila Maadam’ stone lanterns, rockeries, etc.”

divine beauty of rose buds

ooty rose

The workers in the garden warned us that the flowers were few in this rainy season (August) and that season time was April –May. There were 4000 varieties of roses spread over five sloping terraces.

rose garden ooty 3

shades of red

roses

The garden has beautiful walkways and landscaped terraces on the sloping hillside and it takes an hour or two to see everything..well, almost everything!!..It’s so big. Situated on the hill slopes, it offers lovely views of Ooty. A great place to visit!

pink rose dm

rose garden ooty (2)

cen. rose garden

rose garden

 

kids at play

 

 

lanscaping

 

Stone House Museum – Ooty

Stone house Government museum, Ooty
Stone house Government museum, Ooty

The Government Museum housed in Stone House, Ooty is a small museum and one of two state-run museums in Ooty. It has a delightful collection of stuffed animals and birds, mounted hunting trophies along with regular exhibits of ancient coins, metalware, rock samples, wood carvings, to name a few. It also showcases artefacts of the tribal communities of the Nilgiris, the Todas, Badagas,Kurumba and Irula tribes with separate sections devoted to each tribe.

The models of Toda hut and temple are interesting with diagrams of the architecture used in building them. This museum has to be seen at a leisurely pace to fully appreciate the exhibits on display. There are some rare and unusual exhibits like bamboo manuscripts which are manuscripts made on bamboo strips, and colorful puppets made from leather and used in traditional shadow play(Bommalaatam, Nizhalaatam).

Wood Sculptures
Wood Sculptures
Mounted Trophies,Stone house, Ooty
Mounted Trophies,Stone house,Ooty
Stufffed animals and birds
Stufffed animals and birds
Stuffed fowl
Stuffed Fowl

Megalithic burial urns

Bamboo Manuscripts
Bamboo Manuscripts
Miniature model of a Toda hut
Miniature model of a Toda hut
Miniature of Toda temple and hut
Miniature of Toda temple and hut
Palm-leaf Manusripts
Palm-leaf Manusripts
Leather puppets of Tamilnadu
Leather puppets of Tamilnadu

There is a copper embossed plate with intricate details depicting Sethu Bandanam, an important occurance described in detail by Sage Valmiki in the Ramayana involving the building of a bridge across the sea by the Vanara Sena to reach Lanka and rescue Sita.

Sethubandana - embossed copper plate
Sethubandana – embossed copper plate
Sethubandana - embossed copper plate
Sethubandana – embossed copper plate

Considering the fact that the Ramayana is a documentation by Sage Valmiki on events that happened a million years ago and the Sethu Bhandanam event described in it has been corroborated by NASA’s  satellite picture of the bridge beneath the sea, the importance of artefacts such as this copper plate is momentous. The exact period of the copper plate is not known. Parts of it are damaged but the sheer beauty of the embossed plate and the etching of myriad details is fascinating. These are details described by Sage Valmiki in  the Yudha Kaanda of the Ramayana.

Sethu bandhanam in epics 2.1. Valmiki10 describes the construction of ‘Sethu’, which was built in a record time of 5 days under the leadership of Nala, the son of Viswakarma, in his Ramayana in 25 verses. Rama asks Nala to construct a dam on the sea to Srilanka, as advised by Samudraraja. Nala agrees and Vanaras who looked like high mountains went in all directions and brought mountain like rocks and stones. They brought trees, either cut or uprooted. The vanara sena uprooted rocks which resembled huge elephants, using machines and brought them to the seashore with the help of carrier vehicles. “The dam constructed by Nala who was as skilled and talented as his illustrious father, looked like milky way” says Valmiki. The joyous roar raised by the vanaras on completion of the dam silenced even the deadliest noise of the mighty ocean.11 92

Source: https://www.slideshare.net/kalyan97/annexures

Stone House

Stone House - Ooty
Stone House – Ooty

While the museum, though small is very interesting, Stone House itself is filled with history. Its history is intrinsically connected with the history of Ooty. It was the home that John Sullivan built for himself and his family in 1822, the first European dwelling to be built in Ooty.

John Sullivan

John Sullivan
Picture of John Sullivan in Stone House, Ooty

John Sullivan, the Collector of Coimbatore set out to explore the Nilgiris in 1819 after obtaining an order charging him to investigate the “origin of the fabulous tales that are circulated concerning the Blue Mountains to verify their authenticity and to send a report to the authorities”.

He first reached Kotagiri where a small British settlement was established. Ooty was still ‘undiscovered’. In April 1822  Sullivan arrived in Ootakamund, bought land from the Todas at ‘roughly a rupee an acre’ and started work on his Stone House so called because it was built entirely of stone, which he completed the following year. It was called Kal Bangala by the tribals, kal being the tamil word for stone.

In a letter he wrote to Thomas Munro,the Governor of Madras, he says, ….this is the finest country ever…it resembles I suppose Switzerland more than any other part of Europe…the hills beautifully wooded and fine strong spring with running water in every valley.

Sullivan established the hill station of Ootacamund, the first hill station of India. Convalescent British soldiers were sent here to recuperate and it became a home away from home of the British community residing in  India.He also created Ooty lake by damming a stream to meet the water requirements of the new town. 

Most important is the fact that John Sullivan was a progressive and liberal person who insisted that the Todas be given freedom to manage their own affairs. He was called ‘a friend of the natives’.

Sullivan was instrumental in cultivation of fruits, vegetables, barley and tea in the hills. The Ooty we see today is a legacy of this enterprising Englishman. 

Stone House with its small rooms and bay windows has stood the test of time, a beautiful legacy of British architecture and  British colonial India.

External links

http://www.thehindu.com/thehindu/mag/2005/01/16/stories/2005011600580100.htm

http://www.thehindu.com/thehindu/mag/2002/03/17/stories/2002031700210800.htm

OOTY – A Weekend in August

There was a long holiday for Vinayaka Chaturthi in the last week of August and a visit to Ooty was planned rather suddenly. We were on our way by three in the afternoon on Friday, 25th August, had reached Mettupalayam in the foothills by six or seven and arrived in Ooty by nine p.m. slowed down a bit by all the vehicles on the winding mountain road..all holiday makers like ourselves. It looked as if everyone had the same brainwave that we had.. namely a holiday in Ooty!!It was after dark that we negotiated the mountain road and passed many mountain villages. What made the journey memorable was that the villages were decked with festive lights and we passed many colorful Ganesha pandals. We passed many village temples as well which were open at that late hour and could see people going home from the temples. It was Vinayaka chaturthi after all… and I remember thinking how nice that we were travelling on this special day and could see all the happy scenes.

Ooty is one of the most popular hill stations of India. Much has been written about this beautiful town in the Blue mountains – The Nilgiris. This post and the next few ones are my memories of a wonderful holiday and I hope you enjoy reading about them.

Doddabetta

On Saturday morning after breakfast,the first place of visit was Doddabetta, the highest peak in the Nilgiris at 2636 MSL(  8,650 ft.),8km from Ooty. The flat summit has a reserve forest area around it and is accessible by road. This is a most popular tourist destination in Ooty.

The spectacular views of Ooty from the observation tower are out of this world and on clear days many important places near Ooty  can be seen. The place has a cafeteria for snacks and tea. It’s a lovely place where everyone tends to linger, to enjoy the 360 degree views, the strong winds,the mists and the August drizzles and to take pictures.

Doddabetta, ooty

Doddabetta 1
View from the Observation Tower in Doddabetta, Ooty
Doddabetta 4
The Telescope and observation tower, Doddabetta, Ooty
Doddabetta 3
Doddabetta. Ooty
Doddabetta 5
Doddabetta, Ooty
Doddabetta 6
A Time for fun…in Doddabetta Ooty

Benchmark Tea Factory, Tea Museum, Chocolate Factory

On the way back from Doddabetta peak we were given discount coupons to be used in Benchmark Tea factory and Museum. So our next stop was Benchmark Tea factory which was located about 4km from Doddabetta. Tourists are given a guided tour of the factory where you can read about the history of tea and other interesting information in the beautifully illustrated pictures around the museum. You can see the tea leaves being dried and processed. You can sample nine different varieties of tea free of cost. Chocolate is made here and visitors can taste a free sample. You can buy varieties of tea and chocolates and eucalyptus oil at the retail counters in the premises.

The next place we visited was the Government museum which is the subject of my next post.

Late afternoon we went to the beautiful Ooty lake and went boating. Then it started to rain! And then one of the pedals on the pedal boat came off and back we came to the boathouse. While TTDC did ask us to take another boat we had had enough boating for the day. 

These are some pictures on the history of tea taken inside the Benchmark Tea museum.

benchmark -Ooty

Emperor Shen Nung (2)

benchmark 5

benchmark 4

 

View from the Benchmark tea factory
A view from Benchmark Tea Museum

 

 

Dravidian Temple Architecture

What strikes one first on a visit to a Hindu temple in Tamil Nadu, India are the towering Gopurams (pyramidal gateway towers)with their hundreds of colorful stucco figures, the beauty of the many pillared halls, the intricacy of the sculptures of a bygone era, the many temple tanks, and pillared corridors and circumambulatory pathways of stone. A seemingly chaotic array,though on closer observation, one finds that there is order and an underlying pattern in the design and construction of the temples and temple complexes.

Architecture of a Tamil Nadu temple
Architecture of a Tamil Nadu temple
A pillared hallway serves as a classroom
A Thevaram recital in progress in a pillared hallway in the Ardhanareeswara temple, TN,India

Temples were built with strict adherence to the rules laid down in the Agamas and the Silpa sastras. While the Agamas are non-vedic traditional manuals on a vast range of subjects including Temple architecture, Silpa sastra literally means the Science of arts and crafts of which we find the finest specimens in the temples. This style of architecture is known as the Dravidian style of architecture.